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The state-by-state license renewal cycle for radio stations that will take place over the next three years commenced on April 1, 2019.  That was when the first batch of radio broadcasters (DC, MD, VA, and WV) began airing their pre-filing announcements ahead of the June 1, 2019[1] filing date for their license renewal applications.  The cycle then repeats, with a license renewal application deadline (based on state) occurring on the first day of every other month until 2022, by which time all full power, FM translator, and LPFM stations should have filed applications seeking a new eight-year license term.  Stations can determine their license renewal date by reviewing the FCC’s state-by-state license renewal timeline.

The FCC’s license renewal application form (FCC Form 2100, Schedule 303-S) may at first appear straightforward, consisting mostly of yes/no questions.  However, appearances can be deceiving, as evidenced by the countless fines, consent decrees, and other enforcement actions levied against stations that either failed to verify the accuracy of their certifications before filing, failed to timely file their license renewal application, or whose failure to comply with the FCC’s rules over their eight-year license term became apparent at license renewal time.

Those risks have increased significantly in this license renewal cycle, as it will be the first one in which all broadcast station Public Inspection Files are online.   The ability of the FCC, petitioners, and anyone else to review a station’s Public Inspection File online, at any time of day or night, and to peruse the electronic time stamps indicating exactly when documents were uploaded, creates a regulatory minefield for any applicant that has not been fastidious in preparing for its license renewal and in completing its license renewal application.

The bulk of the license renewal application consists of certifications whereby the applicant confirms its compliance with various FCC rules and requirements.  If an applicant certifies it has complied with those rules and requirements, and that assertion is not contested by a petitioner or the FCC’s own records, the FCC will generally not request additional evidence of compliance and will grant the station’s license renewal application.  Where the application is challenged by a petitioner with evidence that one or more of the station’s certifications is false, the FCC may ask the applicant for additional information to determine if grant of the license renewal application will serve the public interest.

One of the certifications that carries the highest risk of generating a fine is the certification that the station has timely placed all required documents in its Public Inspection File.  The base fine for a Public Inspection File violation is $10,000, and the FCC can adjust that amount upward if it finds multiple or egregious violations have occurred.

That means a station whose online Public Inspection File is not complete is already subject to a sizable fine. Falsely certifying compliance in the license renewal application creates the risk of additional fines, and in extreme cases, may persuade the FCC that license renewal is simply not in the public interest.

As a result, before completing the license renewal application, stations should thoroughly review their Public Inspection File to ensure it is complete and that the time stamps indicate all documents were timely uploaded.  If the Public Inspection File is not complete, stations should upload the missing documents as quickly as possible and be prepared to disclose that fact in their license renewal application.  With the Public Inspection File now online, it is easy for the FCC or a petitioner to challenge the accuracy of a station’s license renewal certifications—quite different from the days when a broadcast employee might reach retirement age without ever encountering a Public Inspection File visitor.  It is therefore even more important to a station’s well-being during this renewal cycle to fix any problems spotted as promptly as possible rather than just pretending those problems don’t exist when certifying rule compliance in the license renewal application.

The License Renewal Process

The first point to note is that a license renewal application is just that—an application—and not a guarantee of a new license term.  The Communications Act of 1934, as amended (the “Act”) requires all radio broadcasters to obtain from the FCC an authorization to operate.  By filing Schedule 303-S, an applicant requests its authorization be extended for another eight years.  The Act requires the FCC to grant such an application only if it finds that during the preceding license term: (1) the station has served the public interest, convenience, and necessity; (2) the licensee has not committed any serious violations; and (3) there have been no other violations by the licensee of the FCC’s rules and regulations which, taken together, would constitute a pattern of abuse.  To this end, the FCC invites petitions to deny, informal objections, and comments from the public for every license renewal application, and will review the application and these other submissions to make a determination as to whether the station at issue is deserving of license renewal. Continue reading →

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This Pillsbury Broadcast Station Advisory is directed to radio and television stations in the areas noted above, and highlights upcoming deadlines for compliance with the FCC’s EEO Rule.

June 1 is the deadline for broadcast stations licensed to communities in Arizona, the District of Columbia, Idaho, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming to place their Annual EEO Public File Report in their Public Inspection File and post the report on their station website.  In addition, certain of these stations, as detailed below, must submit their two most recent EEO Public File Reports along with FCC Form 2100, Schedule 396 as part of their license renewal application submissions due on June 3.

Under the FCC’s EEO Rule, all radio and television station employment units (“SEUs”), regardless of staff size, must afford equal opportunity to all qualified persons and practice nondiscrimination in employment.

In addition, those SEUs with five or more full-time employees (“Nonexempt SEUs”) must also comply with the FCC’s three-prong outreach requirements.  Specifically, Nonexempt SEUs must (i) broadly and inclusively disseminate information about every full-time job opening, except in exigent circumstances, (ii) send notifications of full-time job vacancies to referral organizations that have requested such notification, and (iii) earn a certain minimum number of EEO credits, based on participation in various non-vacancy-specific outreach initiatives (“Menu Options”) suggested by the FCC, during each of the two-year segments (four segments total) that comprise a station’s eight-year license term.  These Menu Option initiatives include, for example, sponsoring job fairs, participating in job fairs, and having an internship program.

Nonexempt SEUs must prepare and place their Annual EEO Public File Report in the Public Inspection Files and on the websites of all stations comprising the SEU (if they have a website) by the anniversary date of the filing deadline for that station’s license renewal application.  The Annual EEO Public File Report summarizes the SEU’s EEO activities during the previous 12 months, and the licensee must maintain adequate records to document those activities.  As discussed below, nonexempt SEUs must submit to the FCC their two most recent Annual EEO Public File Reports when they file their license renewal applications.

For a detailed description of the EEO Rule and practical assistance in preparing a compliance plan, broadcasters should consult The FCC’s Equal Employment Opportunity Rules and Policies – A Guide for Broadcasters published by Pillsbury’s Communications Practice Group.  This publication is available at: http://www.pillsburylaw.com/publications/broadcasters-guide-to-fcc-equal-employment-opportunity-rules-policies.

Deadline for the Annual EEO Public File Report for Nonexempt Radio and Television SEUs

Consistent with the above, June 1, 2019 is the date by which Nonexempt SEUs of radio and television stations licensed to communities in the states identified above, including Class A television stations, must (i) place their Annual EEO Public File Report in the Public Inspection Files of all stations comprising the SEU, and (ii) post the Report on the websites, if any, of those stations.  LPTV stations are also subject to the broadcast EEO Rule, even though LPTV stations are not required to maintain a Public Inspection File.  Instead, these stations must maintain a “station records” file containing the station’s authorization and other official documents and must make it available to an FCC inspector upon request.  Therefore, if an LPTV station has five or more full-time employees, or is otherwise part of a Nonexempt SEU, it must prepare an Annual EEO Public File Report and place it in the station records file.

These Reports will cover the period from June 1, 2018 through May 31, 2019. However, Nonexempt SEUs may “cut off” the reporting period up to ten days before May 31, so long as they begin the next annual reporting period on the day after the cut-off date used in the immediately preceding Report.  For example, if the Nonexempt SEU uses the period June 1, 2018 through May 22, 2019 for this year’s report (cutting it off up to ten days prior to May 31, 2019), then next year, the Nonexempt SEU must use a period beginning May 23, 2019 for its report. Continue reading →

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Full power commercial and noncommercial radio stations and LPFM stations licensed to communities in North Carolina and South Carolina must begin airing pre-filing license renewal announcements on June 1, 2019.  License renewal applications for these stations, and for in-state FM translator stations, are due by August 1, 2019.

Full power commercial and noncommercial radio and LPFM stations must air four pre-filing announcements alerting the public to the upcoming renewal application filing.  As a result, these radio stations must air the first pre-filing renewal announcement on June 1.  The remaining pre-filing announcements must air once a day on June 16, July 1, and July 16, for a total of four announcements.  At least two of these four announcements must air between 7:00 am and 9:00 am and/or 4:00 pm and 6:00 pm.

The text of the pre-filing announcement is as follows:

On [date of last renewal grant], [call letters] was granted a license by the Federal Communications Commission to serve the public interest as a public trustee until December 1, 2019.  [Stations that have not received a renewal grant since the filing of their previous renewal application should modify the foregoing to read: “(Call letters) is licensed by the Federal Communications Commission to serve the public interest as a public trustee.”]

Our license will expire on December 1, 2019.  We must file an application for renewal with the FCC by August 1, 2019.  When filed, a copy of this application will be available for public inspection at www.fcc.gov.  It contains information concerning this station’s performance during the last eight years [or other period of time covered by the application, if the station’s license term was not a standard eight-year license term] Individuals who wish to advise the FCC of facts relating to our renewal application and to whether this station has operated in the public interest should file comments and petitions with the FCC by November 1, 2019.

Further information concerning the FCC’s broadcast license renewal process is available at [address of location of the station][1] or may be obtained from the FCC, Washington, DC 20554, http://www.fcc.gov/.

If a station misses airing an announcement, it should broadcast a make-up announcement as soon as possible and contact counsel to further address the situation.  Special rules apply to noncommercial educational stations that do not normally operate during any month when their announcements would otherwise be due to air, as well as to other silent stations.  These stations should also contact counsel regarding how to give the required public notice.

Post-Filing License Renewal Announcements

Once the license renewal application has been filed, full power commercial and noncommercial radio and LPFM stations must broadcast six post-filing renewal announcements.  These announcements must air, once per day, on August 1, August 16, September 1, September 16, October 1, and October 16, 2019.  At least three of these announcements must air between 7:00 am and 9:00 am and/or 4:00 pm and 6:00 pm.  At least one announcement must air in each of the following time periods: between 9:00 am and noon, between noon and 4:00 pm, and between 7:00 pm and midnight.

The text of the post-filing announcement is as follows:

On [date of last renewal grant], [call letters] was granted a license by the Federal Communications Commission to serve the public interest as a public trustee until December 1, 2019.

Our license will expire on December 1, 2019. We have filed an application for renewal with the FCC.

A copy of this application is available for public inspection at www.fcc.gov.  It contains information concerning this station’s performance during the last eight years [or such other period of time covered by the application, if the station’s license term was other than a standard eight-year term].

Individuals who wish to advise the FCC of facts relating to our renewal application and to whether this station has operated in the public interest should file comments and petitions with the FCC by November 1, 2019.

Further information concerning the FCC’s broadcast license renewal process is available at [address of location of the station] or may be obtained from the FCC, Washington, DC 20554, www.fcc.gov. Continue reading →

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Pillsbury’s communications lawyers have published FCC Enforcement Monitor monthly since 1999 to inform our clients of notable FCC enforcement actions against FCC license holders and others.  This month’s issue includes:

  • FCC Revokes License for Unpaid Regulatory Fees; Warns Other Stations of Similar Fate
  • Texas Station Warned Over Multiple Tower and Transmission Violations
  • FCC Nabs Massachusetts Pirate While Commission Continues to Push for Anti-Piracy Legislation

Winter Comes for FM Station With Unpaid Regulatory Fees

The FCC’s Media Bureau published a trio of orders this month relating to the unpaid regulatory fees of three unrelated FM stations.  In the most severe case, the Media Bureau revoked the license of a Massachusetts station, ordering it to cease operations immediately.  The Bureau also initiated license revocation proceedings for overdue fees from stations in Illinois and Louisiana.

The Communications Act requires the FCC to assess and collect regulatory fees for certain regulated activities, including broadcast radio.  The FCC assesses a 25 percent penalty on any late or missing payments.  Failure to pay these regulatory fees or related penalties is grounds for license revocation.

The Media Bureau initially sent the Massachusetts licensee several Demand Letters requiring payment of delinquent fees.  The licensee did not respond to them.  Subsequently, in November 2018, the Media Bureau issued an Order to Pay or to Show Cause, which required the licensee to either pay its overdue fees or demonstrate why it did not owe them.  As we discussed at the time, between fiscal years 2014 and 2018, the licensee had accumulated a debt to the FCC of $9,641.73 in unpaid fees and related charges.  After the licensee failed to respond to the November Order, the Media Bureau issued a Revocation Order.  This “death sentence” terminates the licensee’s authority to operate the station and deletes the station’s call sign from FCC databases.

Shortly after releasing the Revocation Order, the Media Bureau issued two separate Orders to Pay or to Show Cause to the licensees of FM stations in Louisiana and Illinois.  According to the Media Bureau, the Louisiana licensee owes the FCC $11,386.77 in regulatory fees, interest, penalties, and other charges for fiscal years 2009, 2011-2014, and 2017, and the Illinois licensee owes $17,296.21 for fiscal years 2007, 2009, 2010, 2012, and 2013.  The Media Bureau had previously sent various notices and Demand Letters to the licensees regarding the overdue amounts without success.

The Louisiana and Illinois licensees each have 60 days in which to submit evidence showing that either full payment has been made, or that payment should be waived or deferred, lest they suffer the same fate as the Massachusetts FM station.

Who Monitors the Monitoring Points?  FCC Warns Texas AM Station Over Multiple Tower and Transmission Violations

The FCC’s Enforcement Bureau issued a Notice of Violation (“NOV”) against the tower owner and licensee of a Dallas-area AM station for improper tower painting and lighting and for operating at variance from its license. Continue reading →

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Last April, the broadcast industry was abuzz with the need to register previously unlicensed earth stations in order to reduce the chance of future displacement.  In April 2018, the deadline for submitting the registrations was announced, and after two extensions, all fixed-satellite service (FSS) earth stations in use prior to April 19, 2018 that operated in the 3.7 to 4.2 GHz band were to be registered with the FCC by October 31, 2018.

Subsequent to the April 2018 announcement, the FCC adopted an Order and Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding the potential for re-purposing the 3.7-4.2 GHz band.  Since then, most of the focus (over 400 submissions thus far) has been on various proposals for reallocating the spectrum band for 5G use.  Simultaneously, the FCC has worked to implement the Order’s information collection requirements.

In particular, the Order required all FSS earth station operators in the 3.7-4.2 GHz band (either licensed or registered) to submit a certification which confirmed that the information currently contained in the FCC’s records is accurate and complete.  Reducing the potential impact of this new requirement somewhat was the FCC’s decision to exempt those operators that submitted license applications or registrations during the April-October 2018 window referenced above.  The Order also sought additional information from both (i) operators of temporary fixed or transportable earth stations (i.e., satellite news gathering trucks) and (ii) operators of FSS space stations (or grantees of U.S. market access).

On April 11, 2019, the FCC released a Public Notice outlining the procedures for submitting the required certifications and related information by May 28, 2019.  Operators of FSS earth stations that were licensed or in use prior to April 19, 2018, must therefore submit the following information:

  • Relevant call sign(s);
  • File numbers;
  • Applicant or registrant name; and
  • Signed certification statement: “The undersigned, individually and for the applicant, licensee, or registrant, hereby certifies that all information reflected in his or her licenses or registrations in IBFS, including any attached exhibits, are true, complete and correct to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, and have been made in good faith.”

Additionally, all operators of temporary-fixed or transportable FSS earth stations (regardless of when the stations were licensed and/or registered) must also submit the following information for each licensed or registered facility:

  • Earth station call sign (or IBFS file number if a registration filed between April 19, 2018 and October 31, 2018 is pending);
  • Address where the equipment is typically stored;
  • The area within which the equipment is typically used;
  • How often the equipment is used and the duration of such use (i.e., examples of typical deployments, such as operation x days a week at sports arenas within a radius of y miles of its home base);
  • Number of transponders typically used in the 3.7-4.2 GHz band and extent of use on both the uplink and downlink; and
  • Licensee/registrant and point of contact information.

Interestingly, the FCC did not create a new electronic submission form for these filings.  Instead, the required information must be submitted through the International Bureau’s filing system as a pleading, which will provide additional flexibility for operators in preparing their submissions.  However, given the short period of time to file, we suggest that operators start working on gathering the required information as soon as possible.

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Embedded in the Music Modernization Act signed into law in 2018 was a provision that extended most federal copyright protections to pre-1972 sound recordings.  Prior to the enactment of the MMA, sound recordings made prior to February 15, 1972, may have been protected under state law, but federal copyright law protections did not apply.

While the MMA extended federal copyright protections to this subset of sound recordings, it also included language that provided an opportunity for digital audio service providers (i.e., streamers and podcasters) that play pre-1972 songs to avoid statutory damages and payment of attorney’s fees should the provider be found to have infringed the artist’s copyright.

On March 22, 2019, the Copyright Office adopted its final rule, requiring interested digital audio service providers to file a form with the Copyright Office providing contact information for the provider, and payment of a filing fee of $105 per digital audio platform.  The online form must be filed (and the payment submitted) no later than Tuesday, April 9, 2019.

As described in the Copyright Office’s adopting order:

Under the Act, rights owners must also provide specific notice of unauthorized use to certain entities that were previously transmitting Pre-1972 Sound Recordings before pursuing certain remedies against them. To be entitled to receive direct notice of unauthorized activity from a rights owner, an entity must have been publicly performing a Pre-1972 Sound Recording by means of digital audio transmission at the time of enactment of section 1401 and must file its contact information with the Copyright Office within 180 days of enactment, that is, by April 9, 2019. Where a valid notice of contact information has been filed, the rights owner may be eligible to obtain statutory damages and/or attorneys’ fees only after directly sending the transmitting entity a notice stating that it is not legally authorized to use the Pre-1972 Sound Recording, and identifying the Pre-1972 Sound Recording in a schedule conforming to the requirements by the Office for filing Pre-1972 Schedules. For any eligible transmitting entities that do not file contact information by April 9, 2019, rights owners may seek statutory damages and/or attorneys’ fees resulting from unauthorized uses by those entities after filing Pre-1972 Schedules as described above.

So once the form is filed, an artist who alleges that the digital audio provider has infringed the artist’s pre-1972 copyright must first provide notice of the allegation to the individual listed in the form.  Should the digital audio service provider resolve the alleged infringement within 90 days, the provider will be not be found liable for statutory damages ($150,000 per recording) or for the artist’s attorney’s fees arising from enforcement of the artist’s copyright.

Those that already pay SoundExchange for the right to play pre-1972 sound recordings may balk at the additional effort to submit the Notice of Contact form and pay a fee when, hopefully, they have at all times been in compliance with the SoundExchange-related requirements in that regard.  However, given the simple, straight-forward form, the relatively nominal fee of $105.00 per platform, and the legal minefield that pre-1972 recordings have shown themselves to be over the past several years, streaming platforms that feature classic jazz, oldies, or similar recordings from before February 15, 1972 may find filing the form a worthwhile effort to minimize future infringement hassles.

 

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In a Public Notice released this afternoon, the FCC waived certain quarterly Transition Progress Report requirements for stations in Phases 3, 5, and 8 of the post-auction repack process.

As subscribers to Pillsbury’s legal advisories are aware, stations that were assigned a new channel as part of the post-Incentive Auction repacking process must file Transition Progress Reports on FCC Form 2100, Schedule 387, at various times throughout the transition process.  Along with other reports closer to phase completion, stations must file a report every quarter (“Quarterly Report”) and a report ten weeks out from a station’s phase completion date (“10-Week Report”).

However, as many observers have pointed out, the deadlines for the Quarterly Report and 10-Week Report often fall within days of each other, meaning that a transitioning station would have to expend time and energy on filing one report, only to have to file a near-duplicate report a few days later.

To address this inefficiency, in today’s Public Notice the FCC waived the filing of the April 10 Quarterly Report for Phase 3 stations, the July 10 Quarterly Report for Phase 5 stations, and the January 10, 2020 Quarterly Report for Phase 8 stations.  These stations will still be required to timely file their 10-Week Reports.

This late reprieve may not offer much solace for Phase 3 stations that were already set for their dual Transition Progress Report filings on April 10 and April 12, but better late than never.

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The next Children’s Television Programming Report must be filed with the FCC and placed in stations’ Public Inspection Files by April 10, 2019, reflecting programming aired during the months of January, February and March 2019.

Statutory and Regulatory Requirements

As a result of the Children’s Television Act of 1990 (“Act”) and the FCC rules adopted under the Act, full power and Class A television stations are required, among other things, to: (1) limit the amount of commercial matter aired during programs originally produced and broadcast for an audience of children 12 years of age and under, and (2) air programming responsive to the educational and informational needs of children 16 years of age and under.

These two obligations, in turn, require broadcasters to comply with two paperwork requirements.  Specifically, stations must: (1) place in their Public Inspection File one of four prescribed types of documentation demonstrating compliance with the commercial limits in children’s television, and (2) submit FCC Form 398, which requests information regarding the educational and informational programming the station has aired for children 16 years of age and under.  Form 398 must be filed electronically with the FCC.  The FCC automatically places the electronically filed Form 398 filings into the respective station’s Public Inspection File.  However, each station should confirm that has occurred to ensure that its Public Inspection File is complete.  The base fine for noncompliance with the requirements of the FCC’s Children’s Television Programming Rule is $10,000.

Broadcasters must file their reports via the Licensing and Management System (LMS), accessible at https://enterpriseefiling.fcc.gov/dataentry/login.html.

Noncommercial Educational Television Stations

Because noncommercial educational television stations are precluded from airing commercials, the commercial limitation rules do not apply to such stations.  Accordingly, noncommercial television stations have no obligation to place commercial limits documentation in their Public Inspection Files.  Similarly, though noncommercial stations are required to air programming responsive to the educational and informational needs of children 16 years of age and under, they do not need to complete FCC Form 398.  They must, however, maintain records of their own in the event their performance is challenged at license renewal time.  In the face of such a challenge, a noncommercial station will be required to have documentation available that demonstrates its efforts to meet the needs of children. Continue reading →

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The next Quarterly Issues/Programs List (“Quarterly List”) must be placed in stations’ Public Inspection Files by April 10, 2019, reflecting information for the months of January, February and March 2019.

Content of the Quarterly List

The FCC requires each broadcast station to air a reasonable amount of programming responsive to significant community needs, issues, and problems as determined by the station.  The FCC gives each station the discretion to determine which issues facing the community served by the station are the most significant and how best to respond to them in the station’s overall programming.

To demonstrate a station’s compliance with this public interest obligation, the FCC requires the station to maintain and place in the Public Inspection File a Quarterly List reflecting the “station’s most significant programming treatment of community issues during the preceding three month period.” By its use of the term “most significant,” the FCC has noted that stations are not required to list all responsive programming, but only that programming which provided the most significant treatment of the issues identified.

Given that program logs are no longer mandated by the FCC, the Quarterly Lists may be the most important evidence of a station’s compliance with its public service obligations.  The lists also provide important support for the certification of Class A television station compliance discussed below.  We therefore urge stations not to “skimp” on the Quarterly Lists, and to err on the side of over-inclusiveness.  Otherwise, stations risk a determination by the FCC that they did not adequately serve the public interest during the license term.  Stations should include in the Quarterly Lists as much issue-responsive programming as they feel is necessary to demonstrate fully their responsiveness to community needs.  Taking extra time now to provide a thorough Quarterly List will help reduce risk at license renewal time.

It should be noted that the FCC has repeatedly emphasized the importance of the Quarterly Lists and often brings enforcement actions against stations that do not have fully complete Quarterly Lists or that do not timely place such lists in their Public Inspection File.  The FCC’s base fine for missing Quarterly Lists is $10,000.

Preparation of the Quarterly List

The Quarterly Lists are required to be placed in the Public Inspection File by January 10, April 10, July 10, and October 10 of each year.  The next Quarterly List is required to be placed in stations’ Public Inspection Files by April 10, 2019, covering the period from January 1, 2019 through March 31, 2019. Continue reading →

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Each full power and Class A TV station being repacked must file its next Transition Progress Report with the FCC by April 10, 2019.  The Report must detail the progress a station has made in constructing facilities on its newly-assigned channel and in terminating operations on its current channel during the months of January, February and March 2019.[1]

In a March 28, 2019 Public Notice, the FCC waived the quarterly Transition Progress Report requirement with regard to Phase 3 stations for the report due on April 10, 2019, with regard to Phase 5 stations for the report due on July 10, 2019, and with regard to Phase 8 stations for the report due on January 10, 2020.  In all three cases, the quarterly deadline falls within days of the deadline for those stations’ 10-Week Report (which stations must continue to timely file), making the quarterly report redundant.  See infra.

Following the 2017 broadcast television spectrum incentive auction, the FCC imposed a requirement that television stations transitioning to a new channel in the repack file a quarterly Transition Progress Report by the 10th of January, April, July, and October of each year.  The first such report was due on October 10, 2017.

The next quarterly Transition Progress Report must be filed with the FCC by April 10, 2019, and must reflect the progress made by the reporting station in constructing facilities on its newly-assigned channel and in terminating operations on its current channel during the period from January 1 through March 31, 2019.  The Report must be filed electronically on FCC Form 2100, Schedule 387 via the FCC’s Licensing and Management System (LMS), accessible at https://enterpriseefiling.fcc.gov/dataentry/login.html.

The Transition Progress Report form includes a number of baseline questions, such as whether a station needs to conduct a structural analysis of its tower, obtain any non-FCC permits or FAA Determinations of No Hazard, or order specific types of equipment to complete the transition.  Depending on a station’s response to a question, the electronic form then asks for additional information regarding the steps the station has taken towards completing the required item.  Ultimately, the form requires each station to indicate whether it anticipates that it will meet the construction deadline for its transition phase. Continue reading →