Internet & Online Category

An Epitaph for Aereo

Scott R. Flick

Posted March 4, 2015

By Scott R. Flick

For a company that could always punch well above its weight in drawing press coverage, Aereo's sale of its assets in bankruptcy last week drew surprisingly little coverage.

Less than a month before last year's Supreme Court decision finding that Aereo's retransmission of broadcast TV signals over the Internet constituted copyright infringement, a Forbes article discussing Aereo's prospects in court noted the company had "a putative valuation of $800 million or so (that could vault up if Aereo wins)." The article went on to note that "It's a tidy business, too, bringing in an estimated $40 million while reaping 77% gross margins ...."

Aereo made its case before a variety of judges and in the court of public opinion that it was an innovative tech company, with a growing patent portfolio and cutting edge technology. When broadcasters argued that Aereo was merely retransmitting broadcast programming to subscribers for a fee without paying copyright holders, Aereo doubled down, arguing before the Supreme Court that it was at the vanguard of cloud computing, and that a decision adverse to Aereo would devastate the world of cloud computing. In a blog post published the day Aereo filed its response brief at the Court, Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia wrote:

If the broadcasters succeed, the consequences to American consumers and the cloud industry are chilling.

The long-standing landmark Second Circuit decision in Cablevision has served as a crucial underpinning to the cloud computing and cloud storage industry. The broadcasters have made clear they are using Aereo as a proxy to attack Cablevision itself. A decision against Aereo would upend and cripple the entire cloud industry.

So Aereo's narrative heading into the Supreme Court was clear: Aereo is a cutting edge technology company that is not in the content business, and a prototypical representative of the cloud computing industry in that industry's first encounter with the Supreme Court.

As CommLawCenter readers know, the Supreme Court rejected that narrative, finding that a principal feature of Aereo's business model was copyright infringement, and the Court saw little difficultly in separating Aereo's activities from that of members of the public storing their own content in the cloud.

The results of Aereo's asset sale reveal much about the accuracy of the Supreme Court's conclusions, and about the true nature of Aereo itself. The value of Aereo's cutting edge technology, patent portfolio, trademark rights, and equipment when sold at auction fell a bit short of last year's $800 million valuation. How much was Aereo worth without broadcast content? As it turns out, a little over $1.5 million. But even that number apparently overstates the value of Aereo's technology as represented by its patent portfolio.

Tivo bought the Aereo trademark, domain names, and customer lists for $1 million, apparently as part of its return to selling broadcast DVRs. Another buyer paid approximately $300,000 for 8,200 slightly-used hard drives.

And the value of the Aereo patent portfolio? $225,000.

To add insult to injury, the patent portfolio was not purchased by a technology company looking to utilize the patents for any Internet video venture. The buyer was RPX, a "patent risk solutions" company. The World Intellectual Property Review quoted an RPX spokesman regarding the purchase, who stated that "RPX is constantly evaluating ways to clear risk on behalf of its more than 200 members. The Aereo bankruptcy afforded RPX a unique opportunity to quickly and decisively remove risk in the media and technology sectors, thus providing another example of the clearinghouse approach at work."

In other words, the Aereo patent portfolio was purchased for its nuisance value, which, having lost the ability to resell broadcast programming, turned out to be all the value Aereo had.


FCC Preempts State Laws Restricting Municipal Broadband Deployment

Posted February 27, 2015

By David Burns

While the FCC's net neutrality order got most of the attention yesterday, the FCC took another major broadband-related action at its February 26 meeting. Over the strenuous objections of incumbent internet service providers ("ISPs"), trade associations for ISPs, states, the National Governor's Association and others, the FCC on a 3-2 vote with Commissioners Pai and O'Rielly dissenting, preempted state laws in Tennessee and North Carolina which placed limitations on municipally-owned broadband networks. The FCC's action, if upheld in the judicial review certain to follow, would allow municipalities currently prohibited by state law from expanding service to do so via federal preemption of those restrictions. Advocates of the FCC's action argue that it will open the door to a more robust expansion of high-speed broadband service, especially in rural areas and other locations that would otherwise be underserved.

The matter began last year when the City of Wilson, North Carolina and the Electric Power Board of Chattanooga, an agency of the City of Chattanooga, Tennessee (the "EPB") challenged state restrictions on their operations. Wilson and the EPB own and operate high-speed fiber broadband networks in their respective communities, and each claimed that it wants to expand the geographic scope of its network but is effectively blocked from doing so by state laws. Wilson and EPB asked the FCC to use its power under Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 to preempt those laws, arguing that they are inconsistent with the federal policy of making broadband available to all Americans.

Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act provides that the FCC "shall take immediate action to accelerate deployment of [broadband to all Americans] by removing barriers to infrastructure investment and by promoting competition in the telecommunications market." Wilson and EPB argued that Section 706 gives the FCC the power to preempt the Tennessee and North Carolina statutes because those statutes constitute barriers to network investment and competition. Wilson and EPB were supported by a number of municipalities and municipal utilities, and organizations representing them, as well as by technology companies such as Netflix and scores of individual commenters. Those parties generally argued that encouraging municipalities such as Wilson and EPB to expand internet service to consumers is precisely the sort of competition that the FCC should be promoting, and would encourage the spread of high speed broadband to rural areas that are unserved or underserved by incumbent ISPs. Wilson, EPB and their supporters also asserted that the state laws limiting municipal broadband service were enacted at the behest of incumbent ISPs to insulate them from competition.

Incumbent ISPs and others opposing Wilson and EPB argued that municipal broadband services often fail to succeed financially, leaving taxpayers stuck with the bill, while not necessarily promoting effective competition or the rollout of broadband to unserved areas. They also argued that the FCC lacks authority to preempt state laws under Section 706 because that provision does not explicitly provide such authority. In addition, they argued that preemption would be inconsistent with the Supreme Court's 2004 decision in Nixon vs. Missouri Municipal League, where municipalities petitioned the FCC for preemption of a Missouri law prohibiting municipalities from providing telecommunications services. At issue in Nixon was the language of Section 253 of the Communications Act of 1934 which provided that no state law could prohibit "the ability of any entity to provide ... telecommunications service." The Court held that "any entity" did not include municipalities, which are political subdivisions of the states themselves. As a result, opponents of Wilson and EPB claimed that Nixon bars the FCC from interfering with a state's sovereignty over its municipalities by preempting the limitations the state has placed on those municipalities.

Although the text of the Order adopted at the February 26 meeting has not yet been released, from the statements made by the Chairman and commissioners at the meeting, it appears the FCC is asserting that its preemption authority empowers it only to strike down the state restrictions, or "red tape" as Chairman Wheeler referred to them, that the states of Tennessee and North Carolina had imposed on municipalities which they had otherwise authorized to provide broadband service. Proceeding from this perspective, a state could ban a municipality from providing broadband service altogether, but once it has given the municipality authority to provide broadband service, it may not impose restrictions that create barriers to network investment and competition.

It is important to note that the FCC's Order is limited to the specific statutes in Tennessee and North Carolina, and that other state laws would have to be considered on a case-by-case basis following the filing of petitions with the FCC by municipalities in those states. However, yesterday's action provides a strong indication of how the current FCC would likely rule in cases involving the other 17 states that have similar restrictions on municipally-provided broadband service.

One can expect at least two things to result from the FCC's action. First, other municipalities wishing to build or expand their own broadband networks may file petitions with the FCC for preemption of laws in their states claiming that those laws restrict municipally-deployed broadband networks.

Second, the FCC's action will almost certainly be subject to judicial challenges and stay requests by the States of Tennessee and North Carolina, as well as other parties in interest. By limiting its claimed authority under Section 706 to review restrictions imposed by states on municipal broadband service to "red tape" restrictions, without disturbing a state's right to make the fundamental decision as to whether a municipality should be permitted to offer broadband service in the first place, the FCC is seeking to navigate a course that will make the preemption more limited and therefore easier to defend in the inevitable court challenges. Whether that will be enough for yesterday's action to survive a trip through the courts remains to be seen.


The Net Neutrality Drama Plays On

Scott R. Flick Paul A. Cicelski

Posted February 26, 2015

By Scott R. Flick and Paul A. Cicelski

The FCC voted on net neutrality rules in an open meeting today (that was delayed an hour due to yet more snow in DC), and the highly anticipated vote ran into a few last minute snags. First, Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, one of the three Democrats on the FCC's five-member Commission and an essential vote given the party-line split at the FCC on net neutrality, asked Chairman Wheeler to scale back some of the proposed provisions in the Order prior to today's vote.

Second, the tension between the Chairman and Republican commissioners Pai and O'Rielly continued, with Pai and O'Rielly not merely voting against the item, but vocally making their case for minimizing rather than expanding the FCC's dominion over Internet business practices. This followed their spirited opposition in the weeks leading up to the meeting, where commissioners Pai and O'Rielly very publicly urged Chairman Wheeler to release the FCC's proposed rules to the public for review and to postpone the vote to allow the public 30 days to comment on those rules, a request which the Chairman rejected.

As anticipated, the final vote today was a 3-2 split in favor of reclassifying broadband Internet access under Title II of the Communications Act, thereby making it subject to significant regulation by the FCC. Each of the commissioners released a statement in support of their respective position, with statements in favor from Democratic commissioners Wheeler, Clyburn, and Rosenworcel, and statements in opposition from Republican commissioners Pai and O'Rielly.

The FCC released a Public Notice summarizing the rule changes adopted by the Commission in the Order. According to the Public Notice, the FCC adopted the following bright line rules:


  • No Blocking: broadband providers may not block access to legal content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.

  • No Throttling: broadband providers may not impair or degrade lawful Internet traffic on the basis of content, applications, services, or the use of non-harmful devices.
  • No Paid Prioritization: broadband providers may not favor some lawful Internet traffic over other lawful traffic in exchange for consideration of any kind--in other words, no "fast lanes" and no prioritizing the content and services of an Internet Service Provider's (ISP) affiliates.
The FCC also adopted a "standard for future conduct" whereby ISPs cannot "unreasonably interfere with or unreasonably disadvantage" the ability of consumers to select, access, and use the lawful content, applications, services, or devices of their choosing; or of edge providers to make lawful content, applications, services, or devices available to consumers." Finally, the FCC added additional ISP disclosure provisions to its existing transparency rule.

Let the litigation begin.

So how did we reach this regulatory crescendo? The core issue that launched the "network neutrality" debate is whether an Internet Service Provider can deliver selected Internet sites and services to customers faster than others in exchange for compensation from the website receiving the benefit. In line with the FCC's previous approach of treating the Internet as something completely new and different from the telecommunications services it had traditionally regulated, the FCC resisted involving itself in anything that could be described as regulation of the Internet. However, as the Internet grew and it became clear that it (a) was no longer a fledgling service that might be accidentally extinguished by government regulation; and (b) had moved from being a convenience to being as essential to the public as gas or electric, regulatory attitudes began to change.

The result was the FCC's 2005 Open Internet Policy Statement, in which the FCC concluded that ISPs were not subject to mandatory common-carrier regulation like telephone services (referred to as "Title II" regulation because it is governed by Title II of the Communications Act of 1934). The FCC did conclude, however, that it had authority to regulate ISPs under its ancillary authority to impose "light touch" regulatory obligations under the less restrictive Title I of the Communications Act.

Continue reading "The Net Neutrality Drama Plays On"


Copyright Royalty Fee: Annual Minimum Fee Statement of Account Form Due

Posted January 31, 2015

By this date, most commercial and noncommercial webcasters and those simulcasting radio programming over the Internet must submit the Minimum Fee Statement of Account Form and the annual copyright royalty fee to SoundExchange. January 31 is also the date by which certain webcasters and simulcasters are eligible to make elections affecting their royalty rates and reporting requirements for the upcoming year. If your radio broadcast station is simulcast or rebroadcast over the Internet, we encourage you to consult qualified counsel with regard to your obligations.


Comment Dates Set in FCC's Heavily Anticipated MVPD Definition Proceeding

Paul A. Cicelski

Posted January 15, 2015

By Paul A. Cicelski

The press has been abuzz in recent months regarding the launch of various Internet-based video services and the FCC's decision to revisit its current definition of Multichannel Video Programming Distributors (MVPDs). In December, the FCC released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), seeking to "modernize" its rules to redefine what constitutes an MVPD. The FCC's proposals would significantly expand the universe of what is considered an "MVPD" to include a wide-variety of Internet-based offerings. Today, the FCC released a Public Notice providing the dates by which parties can provide their own suggestions regarding how to modify the definition of "MVPD". Comments are now due February 17, 2015, with reply comments due March 2, 2015.

The Communications Act currently defines an "MVPD" as an entity who "makes available for purchase, by subscribers or customers, multiple channels of video programming." Specific examples given of current MVPDs under the Act are "a cable operator, a multichannel multipoint distribution service, a direct broadcast satellite service, or a television receive-only satellite program distributor who makes available for purchase, by subscribers or customers, multiple channels of video programming." The Act states, however, that the definition of MVPD is "not limited" to these examples.

Historically, MVPDs have generally been defined as entities that own the distribution system, such as cable and DBS satellite operators, but now the FCC is asking for comments on two new possible interpretations of the term "MVPD." The first would "includ[e] within its scope services that make available for purchase, by subscribers or customers, multiple linear streams of video programming, regardless of the technology used to distribute the programming." The second would hew closer to the traditional definition, and would "require an entity to control a transmission path to qualify as an MVPD". The FCC's is looking for input regarding the impact of adopting either of these proposed definitions.

What all this means is that the FCC is interested in making the definition of "MVPD" more flexible, potentially expanding it to include not just what we think of as traditional cable and satellite services, but also newer distribution technologies, including some types of Internet delivery.

Underscoring its interest in this subject, the FCC asks a wide array of questions in its NPRM regarding the impact of revising the MVPD definition. The result of this proceeding will have far-reaching impact on the video distribution ecosystem, and on almost every party involved in the delivery of at least linear video programming. Consequently, this is an NPRM that will continue to draw much attention and merits special consideration by those wondering where the world of video distribution is headed next.


Copyright Royalty Fee: Monthly Report of Use and Monthly Usage Statement of Account Forms Due

Posted January 14, 2015

Commercial and noncommercial webcasters and online simulcasters must file Monthly Report of Use and Monthly Usage Statement of Account forms with SoundExchange for the month ending November 30, 2014.


FCC Proposes Moving Radio, Satellite TV/Radio, and Cable TV Public Files Online

Lauren Lynch Flick

Posted December 19, 2014

By Lauren Lynch Flick

Yesterday, the FCC released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking proposing that broadcast radio licensees, satellite TV/radio licensees, and cable system operators move the bulk of their public inspection files online. The FCC previously adopted an online public file requirement for broadcast TV, and sees this as the logical next step.

The FCC noted that adoption of the online broadcast TV public file "represent[ed] a significant achievement in the Commission's ongoing effort to modernize disclosure procedures to improve access to public file material." As such, the FCC is proposing the same general approach for transitioning broadcast radio, satellite TV/radio, and cable system operators to an online public file.

Specifically, the FCC proposes to:

  • require entities to upload only documents that are not already on file with the FCC or for which the FCC does not maintain its own database; and


  • exempt existing political file material from the online file requirement and instead require that political file documents be uploaded only on a going-forward basis.
While the FCC indicates it is not generally interested in modifying the content of public inspection files in this proceeding, it does propose some new or modified public inspection file requirements, including:

  • requiring broadcast radio, satellite TV/radio, and cable system operators to post online the location and contact information for their local public file;


  • requiring cable system operators to provide information about the geographic areas they serve; and


  • clarifying the documents required to be kept in the cable public file.
To address online file capacity and technical concerns related to the significant increase in the number of online file users that the proposed expansion will bring, the FCC seeks comment on:

  • whether it should require that only certain components of the public file be moved online;

  • any steps the FCC might take to improve the organization of the online file and facilitate the uploading and downloading of material;

  • the amount of time the FCC should provide entities to upload documents to the online file;

  • whether the FCC should adopt staggered filing dates by service (broadcast radio, satellite radio, satellite TV, and cable);

  • whether to otherwise stagger or alter existing filing deadlines; and

  • any other ways the FCC can improve performance of the online public file database.
With respect to broadcast radio, the proposed online public file rule would require stations to upload all documents required to be in the public file that are not also filed in CDBS (or LMS) or otherwise available at the FCC's website. Just as with the online broadcast TV file, the FCC proposes to exempt letters and emails from the public from being uploaded due to privacy concerns, instead requiring that those documents continue to be maintained in the "paper" local public file.

The FCC "recognize[s] that some radio stations may face financial or other obstacles that could make the transition to an online public file more difficult." In response, the FCC proposes to:

  • begin the transition to an online public file with commercial stations in the top 50 markets that have five or more full-time employees;


  • initially exempt, for two years, non-commercial educational (NCE) radio stations, as well as stations with fewer than five full-time employees from all online public file requirements; and


  • permit exempted stations to voluntarily transition to an online public file early.
The Commission also is seeking comment on:

  • whether it is appropriate to temporarily exempt other categories of radio stations from all online public file requirements, or at least from an online political file requirement;

  • how the FCC should define the category of stations eligible for a temporary exemption;

  • whether the FCC should permanently exempt certain radio stations, such as NCEs and stations with fewer than five full-time employees, from all online public file requirements; and

  • whether the FCC should exclude NCE radio station donor lists from the online public file, thereby treating them differently than NCE TV station donor lists, which must currently be uploaded to the TV online file.
The FCC proposes to treat satellite TV/radio licensees and cable system operators in essentially the same manner as broadcast radio by requiring them to upload only material that is not already on file with the Commission. Because the only document these entities file with the FCC that must be retained in the public inspection file is the EEO program annual report (which the FCC will upload to the file), almost all material required to be kept by these entities in the online file will need to be uploaded.

Comments will be due 30 days after publication of the NPRM in the Federal Register and reply comments will be due 30 days thereafter.


Scott R. Flick and Lauren Lynch Flick of Pillsbury to Speak on "Moving the Political File Online," May 14, 2014

Scott R. Flick Lauren Lynch Flick

Posted May 14, 2014

Scott R. Flick and Lauren Lynch Flick will discuss moving the political file online in this webinar sponsored by the New York State Broadcasters Association on May 14, 2014 at 2:00 PM Eastern Time.


Broadcasters Get a Free Throw in Aereo Case

Scott R. Flick

Posted April 17, 2014

By Scott R. Flick

Oral arguments before the Supreme Court are less than a week away in the Aereo case, and broadcasters are feeling pretty good about their chances. With the Department of Justice, Professor Nimmer (who, along with his father, quite literally wrote the book on copyright), and a host of other luminaries filing in support of the broadcasters' position, the storyline looks a lot like broadcasters have portrayed it from the beginning: that this is a simple case of copyright infringement hidden behind a veil of modern technological obfuscation.

Sensing that such a storyline is fatal to its prospects, Aereo has responded by casting this case as an attack on consumers' use of the cloud, and has attracted some allies based on that storyline. However, it is a pretty thin storyline, as few think that the country's highest court is so careless as to draft a broadcast retransmission rights decision that accidentally destroys the world of cloud computing. The two are not tough to distinguish, and even if the Court secretly disliked cloud computing, it hardly needs to opine on the copyright implications of cloud computing to decide the Aereo question.

Still, lower courts have disagreed on these issues, and only a fool enters the Supreme Court certain that the court will rule in his favor. There are many moving parts, and if a case were easy to decide, it would not have made it to the Supreme Court. That is why both sides will be anxiously watching the oral arguments for hints as to where the various justices stand on the matter.

As of today, however, broadcasters have one less reason to sweat about the outcome. The Court announced yesterday that Justice Alito, who had previously recused himself from the case, is now able to participate. This is a significant development for broadcasters. Because the 2nd Circuit decision being appealed was in Aereo's favor, Alito's earlier recusal meant that the case would be heard by the remaining eight justices. That created the risk of a 4-4 tie, which would leave the adverse 2nd Circuit decision in place.

In that scenario, broadcasters would need to win 5 of the 8 possible votes in order to overturn the lower court decision. That can be a tall order, and impossible if it turns out that four justices are firmly on the Aereo side of the fence. With Alito no longer recused, broadcasters now have an additional avenue for scoring that fifth vote. In other words, it's easier to attract 5 votes out of 9 than it is to get 5 votes out of 8. That means broadcasters are unlikely to find themselves losing on a tie vote, and if the rest of the court should split 4-4, Alito's entry into the fray effectively gives broadcasters a free throw opportunity at the buzzer to score his vote and break that tie. Now broadcasters just need to convert on that opportunity.


Copyright Royalty Fee: Monthly Usage Statement of Account Form Due

Posted March 17, 2014

Commercial and noncommercial webcasters and those simulcasting radio programming over the Internet must by this date submit the Monthly Report of Use and Monthly Usage Statement of Account forms to SoundExchange for the month ending January 31, 2014.


Copyright Royalty Fee: Monthly Usage Statement of Account Form and Quarterly Report of Use Form Due

Posted February 14, 2014

Commercial and noncommercial webcasters and those simulcasting radio programming over the Internet must by this date submit the Monthly Report of Use and Monthly Usage Statement of Account forms to SoundExchange for the month ending December 31, 2013.


Copyright Royalty Fee: Annual Minimum Fee Statement of Account Form Due

Posted January 31, 2014

By this date, most commercial and noncommercial webcasters and those simulcasting radio programming over the Internet must submit the Minimum Fee Statement of Account Form and the annual copyright royalty fee to SoundExchange. January 31 is also the date by which certain webcasters and simulcasters are eligible to make elections affecting their royalty rates and reporting requirements for the upcoming year. If your radio broadcast station is simulcast or rebroadcast over the Internet, we encourage you to consult qualified counsel with regard to your obligations.


Copyright Royalty Fee: Monthly Report of Use and Monthly Usage Statement of Account Forms Due

Posted January 14, 2014

Commercial and noncommercial webcasters and online simulcasters must file Monthly Report of Use and Monthly Usage Statement of Account forms for the month ending November 30, 2013.


Comment Dates Set for FCC's Proposal to Mandate Captioning of IP-Delivered "Video Clips"

Paul A. Cicelski

Posted December 26, 2013

By Paul A. Cicelski

As I have noted on several occasions in the past, the FCC requires that certain video programming delivered online by television stations be captioned if that programming previously aired on television with captions (for a quick refresher you can view my posts "FCC Seeks Greater Clarity on IP Video Captioning Rules", "Second Online Captioning Deadline Arrives March 30", and "First Online Video Closed Captioning Deadline Is Here").

All video programming that appeared on television with captions after April 30, 2012, is considered "covered Internet Protocol (IP) video" and is required to be captioned when shown online. In January of 2012, the FCC released an Order exempting "video clips" and outtakes while requiring that television stations display captioning for prerecorded full-length programming delivered via IP if the programming had aired on television with captions. Where a captioned TV program is streamed on the Internet in segments, it must be captioned if substantial portions of the entire program are shown via those segments.

However, in the latest turn, the FCC is now asking for updated information regarding whether it should remove the "video clip" exemption. It is seeking public comment on the issue, with comments due on January 27, 2014, and reply comments due on February 26, 2014. The FCC's Public Notice asks commenters to answer a number of questions regarding the current state of captioning of IP-delivered video clips, including:

  • What portion of IP-delivered video clips generally, and of IP-delivered news clips specifically, are captioned?
  • Has the availability of captioned versions of such clips been increasing?
  • What is the quality of the captioning on IP-delivered video clips?
  • Should the FCC require captioning of IP-delivered video clips?
  • How are the positions of commenters consistent with the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA), its legislative history, and the intent of Congress to provide video programming access to people with disabilities?
  • What are the potential costs and benefits of requiring captioning of IP-delivered video clips?
  • How have consumers been affected by the absence of closed captioning on IP-delivered video clips, particularly news clips?
  • To the extent that some entities have already captioned these clips, what technical challenges, if any, had to be addressed? How does the captioning of IP-delivered video clips differ from the captioning of full-length IP-delivered video programming?
  • What are the differences between captioning live or near-live IP-delivered video clips, such as news clips, and prerecorded IP-delivered video clips?
  • If the FCC imposes closed captioning obligations on IP-delivered video clips, should the requirements apply to all video clips, or only to a subset of such clips?
  • If only to a subset, what subsets would be most appropriate and what would be the rationale for excluding others?

The FCC also asks for comment on any additional issues relevant to its determination of whether closed captioning of IP-delivered video clips should be required.

TV stations have been making greater use of their websites over the last few years to deliver video programming, and that use is only likely to increase in the years ahead as TV stations expand their use of mobile applications to reach viewers. As a result, the FCC's new proceeding raises important issues that will affect stations' video streaming, online marketing, and bottom line. As the saying goes, you're not entitled to complain about an elected official if you didn't bother to vote, and broadcasters need to speak up now if they want to avoid having to complain later about any complex or burdensome online captioning requirements that might be adopted in this proceeding.


FCC Adopts Proposed FY 2013 Regulatory Fees

Paul A. Cicelski

Posted August 15, 2013

By Paul A. Cicelski

The FCC has released a Report and Order which includes its final determinations as to how much each FCC licensee will have to pay in Annual Regulatory Fees for fiscal year 2013 (FY 2013), and in some cases how the FCC will calculate Annual Regulatory Fees beginning in FY 2014. The FCC collects Annual Regulatory Fees to offset the cost of its non-application processing functions, such as conducting rulemaking proceedings.

The FCC adopted many of its proposals without material changes. Some of the more notably proposals include:

  • Eliminating the fee disparity between UHF and VHF television stations beginning in FY 2014, which is not a particularly surprising development given the FCC's recently renewed interest in eliminating the UHF discount for purposes of calculating compliance with the FCC's ownership limits;
  • Imposing on Internet Protocol TV (IPTV) providers the same regulatory fees as cable providers beginning in FY 2014. In adopting this proposal, the Commission specifically noted that it was not stating that IPTV providers are cable television providers, which is an issue pending before the Commission in another proceeding;
  • Using more current (FY 2012) Full Time Employees (FTE) data instead of FY 1998 FTE data to assess the costs of providing regulatory services, which resulted in some significant shifts in the allocation of regulatory fees among the FCC's Bureaus. In particular, the portion of regulatory fees allocated to the Wireline Competition Bureau decreased 6.89% and that of all other Bureaus increased, with the Media Bureau's portion of the regulatory fees increasing 3.49%; and
  • Imposing a maximum annual regulatory rate increase of 7.5% for each type of license, which is essentially the rate increase for all commercial UHF and VHF television stations and all radio stations. A chart reflecting the FY 2013 fees for the various types of licenses affecting broadcast stations is provided here.
The Commission deferred decisions on the following proposals in the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that launched this proceeding: 1) combining the Interstate Telecommunications Service Providers (ITSPs) and wireless telecommunications services into one regulatory fee category; 2) using revenues to calculate regulatory fees; and 3) whether to consider Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) providers as a new multi-channel video programming distributor (MVPD) category.

The Annual Regulatory Fees will be due in "middle of September" according to the FCC. The FCC will soon release a Public Notice announcing the precise payment window for submitting the fees. As has been the case for the past few years, the FCC no longer mails a hard copy of regulatory fee assessments to broadcast stations. Instead, stations must make an online filing using the FCC's Fee Filer system, reporting the types and fee amounts they are obligated to pay. After submitting that information, stations may pay their fees electronically or by separately submitting payment to the FCC's Lockbox. However, beginning October 1, 2013, i.e. FY 2014, the FCC will no longer accept paper and check filings for payment of Annual Regulatory Fees.